oh, corey.

Ask   twenty-something. texan. writer. loves: all things french, books, korean dramas & her boxer, kipling.

And we deserve to experience love fully, equally, without shame and without compromise. (x)
such a lovely speech. oh, how i cried.

(Source: clarkeemilia, via echofades)

— 2 months ago with 266343 notes
"We can’t jump off bridges anymore because our iPhones will get ruined. We can’t take skinny dips in the ocean, because there’s no service on the beach and adventures aren’t real unless they’re on Instagram. Technology has doomed the spontaneity of adventure and we’re helping destroy it every time we Google, check-in, and hashtag."

Jeremy Glass, We Can’t Get Lost Anymore 

i’m so sick of seeing people trash this generation for no other reason than that things aren’t the way they used to be. there’s this constant vitriolic stream of people snarling that selfies, check-ins and blogs are the death of culture, and i am bored of it.

the human desire to record and document experience is hardly new. without that urge we wouldn’t have art, music, dance, theatre. the world of electronics evolving around that to give us an even broader scope of options to preserve our unique view of the world and share it with others is a beautiful thing. despite a legion of cynical naysayers constantly shouting otherwise, i’ve not actually become immune to earth’s beauty or my own experiences in it. stop being terrified of change and development and calling it profound.

(via thekatediary)

Last line bolded for emphasis

(via fedoraharp)

Additionally, I’m not losing my sense of adventure every time I Google something, I’m feeding my thrist for knowledge. I have easy access to the most information that humanity has ever amassed, and you want me to not use that? Because let’s be real, my ancestors who had a “sense of adventure” were actually far more restricted in their travel. I can travel more widely and more cheaply than any point in human history, and you’re trying to imply that my “sense of adventure” has died because of the very technology that has made that possible?

Actually, how about this: my “sense of adventure” is tempered by the responsibilities and anxieties I carry far more than Google or check-ins or hashtags. My “sense of adventure” is tempered by the money I have (or rather don’t have) in my bank account. My “sense of adventure” is tempered by what society has taught me about traveling alone at night. My “sense of adventure” is tempered by the fact that a girl from my high school went on an adventure and ended up murdered, and whose family is still seeking justice because of the negligence of the local police department. My “sense of adventure” is the same as my ancestors’ “sense of adventure,” and it not this nostalgic retelling of history. 

And how many of these naysayers have actually taken a trip like Steinbeck or William Least Heat-Moon? How many of them have jumped off a bridge? How many of them feel free to benefit from iPhones and Google and cell service and Instagram, but then criticize younger generations for taking full advantage of the world around them?

We can’t jump off bridges anymore because it’s against laws passed by older generations. We can’t take skinny dips in the ocean because it’s against laws passed by older generations, and adventures aren’t a reality for us because they often cost more money than we have. Technology has made travel more cheap and widespread than ever, and we helped destroy it when we weighed an entire generation down with the responsibilities of another.

(via theladyem)

(Source: her0inchic, via jediemma)

— 3 months ago with 249062 notes

makomori:

wish i could say i’m doing st productive on my day off but i just downloaded grease 2 to look @ michelle pfeiffer and listen 2 cool rider on repeat

(via dallowayward)

— 3 months ago with 233 notes
Swedish woman finds 2,000-year-old gold ring - The Local →

paprikapotts:

barbaricyip:

motherfuckingnazgul:

shireen-baratheon:

#THERE ARE LITERALLY THREE MOVIES AND A HUGE-ASS BOOK EXPLAINING WHY KEEPING IT IS A BAD IDEA

"…it felt like a gift from the underworld," Lundin told The Local. "It was my magnificent ring. I didn’t want to give it up."

O_O

image

(via jediemma)

— 3 months ago with 130957 notes

andimjulie:

Finn and Rae in the new My Mad Fat Diary Trailer

I CANNOT EVEN HANDLE THIS. DYING. DYING. AM DEAD.

(Source: chrisze)

— 3 months ago with 11161 notes
#my mad fat diary 
isabruh:

I just scrolled past this…
SOmeone plEAse pick me up from the ground

isabruh:

I just scrolled past this…

SOmeone plEAse pick me up from the ground

(Source: krissenpaii, via elatemyheart)

— 3 months ago with 3828 notes
danielbruhls:

The director is going back to the Western genre with a script called The Hateful Eight, which he hopes to direct this summer, according to sources. 
The title suggests Tarantino could be upping the ante, playing off the title of John Sturges' 1960 film The Magnificent Seven, which in turn was a remake of AkiraKurosawa's 1954 Seven Samurai.
No one has been cast yet, but Tarantino has reached out to veteran casting director Victoria Thomas, who worked on Django, to work with him on casting the movie, say several insiders. A part has been written for Christoph Waltz, who starred in Tarantino’s  Django and Inglourious Basterds.

danielbruhls:

The director is going back to the Western genre with a script called The Hateful Eight, which he hopes to direct this summer, according to sources. 

The title suggests Tarantino could be upping the ante, playing off the title of John Sturges' 1960 film The Magnificent Seven, which in turn was a remake of AkiraKurosawa's 1954 Seven Samurai.

No one has been cast yet, but Tarantino has reached out to veteran casting director Victoria Thomas, who worked on Django, to work with him on casting the movie, say several insiders. A part has been written for Christoph Waltz, who starred in Tarantino’s  Django and Inglourious Basterds.

(via castielenelcielo)

— 3 months ago with 2178 notes